In a Literal Sense

Did you know that the epigraph in The Great Gatsby is entirely made up? With the prolific recently-released trailer and the opulence for which Luhrmann is known, I’ve decided to re-read the Classic just in time for the release of the film (or, 5 months prior, whatever). I figured if I can capture a better sense of the lavishness exuded in Fitzgerald’s work, I can better understand the film as a work of brilliant re-interpretation or merely an upscale Entourage outtake. So in theme, I’ll be heading to check out the opulent ROM party in Toronto tonight (DJs, drinks and dinasours surrounded by marble columns and pristine display cases), and spend tomorrow getting into the Gatsby. Here’s a visual journal of what my weekend will look like–save for the occasional tight ‘n bright party that’s neither here nor there…unless Gatsby threw those, too.

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1 comment
  1. Allyn said:

    I’ve decided to re-read the Classic just in time for the release of the film (or, 5 months prior, whatever). I figured if I can capture a better sense of the lavishness exuded in Fitzgerald’s work, I can better understand the film as a work of brilliant re-interpretation or merely an upscale Entourage outtake.

    I finished rereading Gatsby last night, motivated by the same thing.

    The first time I watched the trailer, my reaction was, “This isn’t anything i know. Fitzgerald didn’t write this.” I’d read the book at least four times in whole, and several more times in parts, but not in at least five years.

    The more I watched the trailer, the more intrigued I was.

    When I finished the book last night, I got the trailer. I could recognize some of the scenes in the trailer (though there’s much that I don’t). The gaudiness, the noise of Gatsby’s parties surprised me; Fitzgerald’s description of them in the book didn’t seem so over-the-top. But then I remembered his line from “Echoes of the Jazz Age” and his description of the era as “the expensive orgy.” Then I understood. Luhrmann’s got the idea. It’s as much an adaptation of Gatsby as an evocation of the idea of the era.

    At least, that’s how I see it now.

    I’m still not convinced I’m going to see it this Christmas. Reviews will have to be phenomenal, and even then it’s in doubt. 🙂

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